Category Archives: Extraordinary

#girls #teens #selfesteem

Announcing Confidence is Queen Tour!

Have a group of girls that could use some motivation? Announcing #ConfidenceisQueenTour !!

Low self esteem is linked to teen pregnancy, poor academic performance, negative behaviors, mental/emotional disorders, and substance abuse. We will be going to schools and organizations conducting 1 – hour girl talk sessions giving girls tools to build confidence , combat negative behaviors , and maximize their potential. Open to all U.S. states! Girls should be between 10 -18 years of age. College groups welcomed. For booking and more information you can contact akilah@iambeautyinc.com . To learn more about I AM BEAUTY visit www.iambeautyinc.com.#bebeautyNOTabully

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The Procrastinators’ Guide to College

They don’t tell you much about succeeding in college when you suffer from selective participation syndrome. It’s the all too familiar, I’ll-do-it-when-I-feel-like-it, let-me-take-a-quick-nap-before-I-start disorder. If your parents refer to you as ‘lazy’ or your teachers describe you as a ‘procrastinator,’ we’re talking about you! The good news about college is you get to create your own schedule, the not so good news is homework is still a thing here. So pull up a chair, because we’re gonna set you up to win at college when all you wanna do is chill in the quad with your squad, but your paper on Plato’s Allegory of the Cave is due the next day.

 

Preparation is Key—the syllabus is your golden ticket to an A in any class. Tack your syllabus to your wall. Enter key dates such as big projects, quizzes and assignment due dates in your phone’s calendar with a week’s reminder. Bonus tip: remember which assignments carry more weight towards your final grade and prioritize accordingly.

 

Schmooze you’re Way to Success—in the beginning of the semester, introduce yourself to your professors. Be straight up about your expectations and feelings about the class. Simply say ‘hey professor Santiago, I’m really excited about taking this class –even if it’s a general education requirement—but I’m equally nervous about it. Can you give me some tips on how to succeed and get an A?’ Bonus tip: visit your professor during office hours. Even if it’s just to say hi, talk to them. Tell them you’re prepping for an upcoming assignment or even ask them about their day. They’re humans too. The point is to build a rapport so you won’t become another faceless student who flunked science in the modern world.

Start your Assignments Early–it seems unrealistic with your condition, but dig this: If you start your assignment as soon as it’s given to you, you’ll complete your assignment before it’s due or maybe just in time. Dedicate at least 30 minutes a day but no more than an hour in one sitting on each assignment. It’ll make your assignments less daunting and there’s more time to do what you please when you really don’t feel like it. Bonus tip: join a study group to keep you accountable for your assignments. Or even, ask your TA (teacher’s assistant) for help.

 

Balance your Selectivity–for every 30 minutes you spend not-really-feeling-like-it, dedicate one hour doing that thing you weren’t really feeling.

 

The painful truth about college is no one is going to beg you to do your work. It doesn’t matter if you’re paying out of pocket or taking out loans or if you have a sweet scholarship, you have to do the work to be successful. Have fun, but certainly prepare for those times when your selective participation syndrome starts to flare up.

 

‘The future belongs to those who prepare for it today.’ Even procrastinators with selective participation syndrome.

Social Media Dos & Don'ts!

Social Media Dos & Don’ts

Social media is one of the most powerful forms of communication teens and adults use today. Here are some tips to help you use social media safely and effectively.

10 Social Media Tips for Teens

1.     Respect yourself. – Show off how great you are with class. You are a brand and should represent yourself accordingly on social media. Make sure your photos are appropriate. Do not post or text photos of yourself naked, dressed provocatively, or making obscene gestures. Avoid uploading anything you would not want your grandmother to see on the front cover of the New York Times! Social media plays a major role in building and ruining personal images. Be wise!

2.     Post with positivity – Keep it cool! If you don’t have anything good to say, don’t post. Avoid ranting or arguing with people on social media and posting when you’re upset. You may be upset with your mom but it would be very disrespectful to share your anger with the world. What do you think college recruiters or future employers might think about you disrespecting your mother on social media? No Bueno! Share positivity and good vibes on the web.

3.     No “twerking” videos please! – Just because you see a trend starting on social media, doesn’t mean it is something you should do. Do not post videos that portray negative images of you, your friends or family involving profanity, sex, nudity, crime, drugs, discrimination, violence, lewd gestures, or anything that could be offensive to the public. Keep your video posts kid friendly. You don’t want a video of you intoxicated and “twerking” inappropriately with friends to surface while you are campaigning for President in 20 years. Definitely not a good idea!

4.     Know your followersAllowing strangers to follow you can be very dangerous. Even if their account looks harmless, be aware that there are many fake accounts where creeps follow their prey. If you don’t know them, ignore them and don’t let them follow you. Also, use privacy settings to protect your accounts from being viewed by strangers. Proceed with caution!

5.     Be careful what you post for likesYou don’t want to end up “instafamous” for something that could destroy your future. Keep your posts positive, dignified and smart. Social media is a great way to build a web presence for future endeavors. Don’t compromise your future for “likes” or “followers.” Make your mark on the web, the right way!

6.    Play nice …Don’t cyber bully! No one has the right to harass anyone based on their sex, race, age, orientation, personal beliefs, values, etc. The impact of harassment is heightened and can have deadly consequences when acted out over the Internet. Avoid engaging in cyber brawls on twitter and status face-offs on Facebook. If you have a personal issue with someone, keep it off the Internet. If anyone is saying things about you on social media, report their account and let a relative know.

7.     Think before you post. – Nothing is ever truly deleted, so be very sure about what you post before you hit the “post” or “send” button.   Once you post a picture or a status it is stored on the site’s server and can normally be retrieved even if you delete it from your profile. So, be smart and post with care for your future!

8.     If you see something, say something! – Report anything inappropriate. Block or un-follow people that post negative comments on your timeline, make you uncomfortable or harass you in any way.

9.     Manage your use wisely – Too much of anything can become a bad thing. Is social media keeping you from getting work done? Try putting time limits on your social media usage to make sure it is not impacting your productivity.

10. Don’t post your every move – Leave some information to share with your real friends and family over the phone. Your best friend would probably want to know you and your boyfriend broke up before the whole world knows via your relationship status change. Also be careful sharing info when you are going out of town. You don’t want to alert a potential burglar that you will be in the Bahamas for a week with your family.

As a teenager it is important that you are aware, informed, and understand the risks that come along with using social media. Remember to protect yourself, censor what you post, and chose the crowd you associate with wisely.